Advertisements
Issues & Insights
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Congress’ Central Planners Want To Block Access To Credit

Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez want to use the police power of the federal government to ban a legitimate business activity because the socialist senator from Vermont finds “it is really disgusting.” To the callow representative from New York, it’s “economic brutality.”

This is the deep thinking that goes into the Democrats’ legislating process. Outlaw something because some subjectively find it repulsive. Or something seems scary. Or appears to be unfair. Or because someone decides for the rest of us “this isn’t who we are.” It’s the sort of lawmaking that should frighten us all.

The menacing scourge that Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez want to save the country from? Credit card interest rates that exceed 15 percent.

“Every major religion on Earth,” says Sanders, “has condemned usury.”

Usury is defined by Investopedia as “the act of lending money at an interest rate that is considered unreasonably high or that is higher than the rate permitted by law.” Merriam-Webster says it is “the lending of money at exorbitant interest rates” or “an unconscionable or exorbitant rate or amount of interest.”

In other words, what constitutes usury is subjective and can be quite capricious. Yet Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez know just what the right number is.

Like all legislation that is concocted from some feel-good point of view, capping credit card interest rates at 15 percent will carry unintended consequences. For instance, it will block access to credit to large group of Americans.

Researchers at the Mercatus Center in Arlington, Virginia, say new laws and regulations on consumer credit “frequently harm the very people they are meant to help by making credit more expensive and harder to obtain.” Lenders price credit at higher rates for consumers with lower credit scores due to the risk involved. If they are not allowed to set rates that will allow them to make a profit, they will stop lending to those customers.

What, then, do these consumers do when they are confronted with “temporary budget shocks,” such as a loss of income, a necessary home or car repair, a medical emergency, or simply an inability to make it to the next payday? Credit can help families and individuals avoid having their utilities shut off, insurance canceled, and even eviction.

Interest rate caps also “force consumers to substitute less-preferred types of credit.” Not everyone can borrow or receive gifts from friends and family. Some have no choice but to incur overdraft fees, which are typically about $35 for each incident and cost consumers more than $34 billion a year. In some cases, overdraft fees are more costly than high-interest credit cards.

In some cases, borrowers will have no choice but to take out black-market loans. At one time, this type of credit was widely used. In the days before financial-market deregulation in the 1960s, “lending was the second-most profitable activity for organized crime,” says the Mercatus study.

Furthermore, restrictions on credit interest rates harm not only those who would lose access to credit but also “individuals and families that don’t use any form of consumer credit by inducing banks to increase fees on bank accounts, ATM transactions, and other services.” They can expect added or increased fees on basic checking accounts, higher minimum-balance requirements, and growing fees on low balances, says the study, as well as more costly checks, and raised charges for in-person and ATM services.

Finally, there is the reality that under a 15 percent cap, banks will trim staff and even close branches in response. But apparently job losses as well as a lack of access to credit are small prices to pay in return for legislating away a practice that one cranky socialist thinks is disgusting.


Issues & Insights is a new site formed by the seasoned journalists behind the legendary IBD Editorials page. We’re just getting started, and we’ll be adding new features as time permits. We’re doing this on a voluntary basis, because we believe the nation needs the kind of cogent, rational, data-driven, fact-based commentary that we can provide. 

Be sure to tell all your friends! And if you’d like to make a contribution to support our effort, feel free to click the Tip Jar over on the right.

J. Frank Bullitt

J. Frank Bullitt has been writing professionally since 1986. After covering local news for years, and putting in some time in Washington, D.C., he began writing opinions in 1998, covering a wide variety of domestic and international topics from a limited-government point of view.

2 comments

  • When I heard their pie in sky idea I almost had coffee coming out my nose! Leave it to people who have ZERO banking experience to tell the banks how to run their business. Prime + 20% has been around for 30 years. Most people pay off their balance in the first month. Those who don’t are higher risk. CC charge offs mandate higher rates then say a HELO. Seeing how deeply intwined the party of Joe Biden is with the banks, this has no chance of becoming law.

    We love your new site, please consider using Disqus for comments.

  • These are the same “experts” that want to give us Medicare for all. And I’m astounded by the genius who came up with the idea of basic income for all. That idea is so astounding dumb and stupid that it could only percolate up from the mind of an insanely stupid and ignorant genius !!

    Alas, the democrat party is full of insanely stupid and ignorant geniuses who’ve never so much as ran a lemonade stand or balanced a checkbook.

Advertisements

About Issues & Insights

Issues & Insights is a new site formed by the seasoned journalists behind the legendary IBD Editorials page. Our goal is to bring our decades of combined journalism experience to help readers understand the top issues of the day. We’re doing this on a voluntary basis, because we believe the nation needs the kind of cogent, rational, data-driven, fact-based commentary that we can provide. 

If you like what you see, feel free to leave a donation. You can also set up regular donations if you like. Just click on the Tip Jar above. It will take you to a PayPal donations page. Your contributions will help us defray the cost of running this site. Thank you!

Subscribe to Issues & Insights via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to Issues & Insights and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,551 other subscribers

Advertisements

Copyright © Issues & Insights

%d bloggers like this: